Pining for the Fjords

You are just as significant in the scheme of things as I am. If you think you can bear it, come and hang out.

grizandnorm:

Influences - AKIRA (1988)

This film is the reason why I grew a passion for animation. It blew away everything I knew or expected from animated films. Keep in mind this movie came out before the “Disney Renaissance” of the 90’s. I rented the movie as an 11-12 year-old thinking it was just a regular (american) animated film. As soon as I started watching it (on VHS), I knew this was something else. I had watched my fair share of japanese animated TV series before, but nothing quite like this. The violence is what surprised me first. As soon as one of the main character hits a member of a rival gang with a metal stick to the head, I knew this wasn’t the type of animated film I was used to. Then the weird “blue kids” start to show up more and more. And Tetsuo goes through some radical changes. What a treat! My young brain couldn’t take it all in from the first viewing. I had to re-watch it many times to see and appreciate everything else it had to offer. At that point, I hadn’t seen a lot of foreign films.  I was used to a more western way of film-making, where we follow a main character’s journey through obstacles until he/she succeeds (or not). Akira is more about painting a world and then following some of its inhabitants in how they deal with this world. It also dealt with ideas and themes I had never encountered in other animated productions. Teen Angst, drug dependence, the abuse of political power, civil unrest, revolution, the fear of nuclear disaster, consciousness, evolution, etc. There is so much in this movie that it could be criticized for not dealing with any of those themes with substance or depth. I think the one thing I took from it is that animated films (or series) don’t have to always play with the same ideas or, dare I say, audiences. As far as animated films go in the western world, they are still  mostly considered “family entertainment”. I love a ton of what’s being made that fits that mold, but I’m still waiting for more and more animated productions that will continue to change and expand those expectations. Akira is in no way a perfect film. Trying to fit 6 huge comics (manga) volumes into one film is almost impossible, but it still holds up to this day, from the ground-breaking animation and incredibly gorgeous and detailed backgrounds, to the fate of a megalopolis threatened by the re-awakening of a superior consciousness. OMG!

Around that time, few other adult-themed anime have reached the same level of success. Akira broke the door open for Japanese animation in the West. A few years later, Ghost In The Shell and Ninja Scroll came along. Many productions paid homage to AKIRA in their own way. I would say the “Batman Beyond: Return Of The Joker” is probably one of the most Akira-influence productions I’ve seen in the West.

Have a great Friday, everyone! I will post more “Influences” post in the future when something comes to mind. Stay tuned!

Norm

— 22 hours ago with 393 notes
oddthingsiveseen:

ODDITY NEWS: Project Underway to Record the Medieval Graffiti on England’s Churches
From the article:

Armed with just a torch and a camera, a team of volunteers have recorded more than 28,000 images from churches in Norfolk alone and are a third of the way through searching Norwich Cathedral, where there are many more examples.

Fun fact: I have never spelled the word “graffiti” right on the first try.
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Always gonna love as much Medieval graffiti as possible (:

oddthingsiveseen:

ODDITY NEWS: Project Underway to Record the Medieval Graffiti on England’s Churches

From the article:

Armed with just a torch and a camera, a team of volunteers have recorded more than 28,000 images from churches in Norfolk alone and are a third of the way through searching Norwich Cathedral, where there are many more examples.

Fun fact: I have never spelled the word “graffiti” right on the first try.

—————————————————————————————————————-

Always gonna love as much Medieval graffiti as possible (:

— 22 hours ago with 1 note
Animation prep process! →

bridgioto:

I thought it might be interesting, if anyone was curious, to post some of the process that went into the short animation project I did at the Gobelins summer program! Apologies for the photos of stuff, the animation paper was a bit big to fit in my scanner u___u

We started off with an assignment:…

— 22 hours ago with 431 notes
maisdue:

Cemetery sketches from today 💀

maisdue:

Cemetery sketches from today 💀

— 22 hours ago with 57 notes

archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Awesome (Grand)parenting salutes 59-year-old grandpa Hidebochi. For 32 years he’s run an udon shop in Mihama, Mie Prefecture, Japan. He’s also been a “weekend carpenter” for 52 years. Those carpentry skills came in very handy when he learned that his two young granddaughters, Ringo (6 years old) and Mei (3 years old), would be moving from Vancouver, Canada to live with him above the udon shop. Just like the little girls in My Neighbor Totoro, Ringo and Mei were moving far away from their first home to a new home out in the country.

In effort to welcome them and prevent them from feeling homesick, Hidebochi decided to recreate the rain scene from My Neighbor Totoro right outside their new home. He constructed a 10-foot-tall Totoro using materials such as wood, water pipes and rugs. Hidebochi’s Totoro stands at the Catbus stop with an umbrella in hand and a welcoming grin on his face.

"A concrete block keeps Totoro secure in front of the Teuchi Udon Ōishi-ka shop. A camera in Totoro’s nose lets Hidebochi’s family know when visitors come to meet the iconic character. Totoro can play music from the film when people visit him.

Totoro waits next to the Kōshiyama Eki Mae catbus stop near the Kōshiyama train station in Mihama. Visitors who want to ride the catbus may be out of luck because it only comes at night from about midnight to 5:00 a.m., according to Hidebochi’s catbus stop sign.”

What’s more, Hidebochi positioned Totoro so that his granddaughters can always see him, smiling up at them, from their room above the udon shop.

Click here to watch a brief video in which Hidebochi shows how he created this awesome Totoro. You’ll also get to see Ringo and Mei help recreate the rain scene. Judging by the smiles on their faces, it seems they’re pretty pleased with their new home and, of course, their awesome grandpa.

Visit RocketNews24 for additional photos and info about Hidebochi’s heartwarming homemade Totoro.

— 1 day ago with 342 notes
drawgabbydraw:

You guys should definitely go check out the first installment of Moth, by Kim Salt. It’s a beautiful, scroll-through narrative. I can’t wait to see more!
idlepassage:

Finally uploaded the first installment of my graphic narrative experiment called Moth. You can check it out here!

drawgabbydraw:

You guys should definitely go check out the first installment of Moth, by Kim Salt. It’s a beautiful, scroll-through narrative. I can’t wait to see more!

idlepassage:

Finally uploaded the first installment of my graphic narrative experiment called Moth. You can check it out here!

— 1 day ago with 188 notes
pixartimes:

FIRST LOOK: ‘Toy Story That Time Forgot’ Poster Is Epic.
Read More »

pixartimes:

FIRST LOOK: ‘Toy Story That Time Forgot’ Poster Is Epic.

Read More »

(via arrrrtful)

— 3 days ago with 219 notes
juliedillon:

emmyc:

reverse falconer

emmy you are a treasure

juliedillon:

emmyc:

reverse falconer

emmy you are a treasure

— 4 days ago with 3384 notes

archiemcphee:

These nightmarish images feel like scenes from a B-movie, but they’re really photos of a powerful traveling art installation by Colombian artist Rafael Gómezbarros entitled Casa Tomada (“Seized House”). Giant ant sculptures swarm across urban exteriors and gallery walls. As if the idea of monstrous ants wasn’t already freaky, these 2-foot-long specimens feature tree branches for legs and segmented bodies made of joined pairs of fiberglass resin skulls and fabric. These hair-raising urban interventions are meant to draw attention to the uprooting, immigration and forced displacement of peasants and migrant workers in Latin America.

"When placed on the facades of government buildings and blank gallery walls alike, the ants give off a chilling sense of foreboding and encroachment. By placing them in swarms, Gómezbarros makes the insects even more strikingly representative of the peasants displaced by war and strife in Gómezbarros’ native Colombia."

Click here to learn more.

[via Design Taxi and Beautiful/Decay]

— 1 week ago with 616 notes